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 SYMPOSIUM
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 46  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 120-126

The role of surgery in the management of intracranial gliomas: Current concepts


1 Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital "Abel Santamaria", Pinar del Rio, Cuba
2 Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; Department of Neurosurgery, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea
3 Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

Correspondence Address:
J T Rutka
Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.49149

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The role of surgery in the management of human gliomas has been controversial. The results from numerous neurosurgical series are inconsistent. The current adjuvant therapies have facilitated treatment of patients, and have rendered neurosurgical removal without morbidity or mortality more commonplace than ever before. Here, we investigated the role of surgery in the management of adults with low- and high-grade gliomas. Even though there is substantial evidence which claims that surgery per se has a role to play in extending patient survival, there is a paucity of randomized clinical trials on this subject, and little in the way of Class II data to support these claims. However, this should not divert patients away from surgery, because there may be additional benefits from a concerted effort to remove a tumor completely. At the present time, it seems best that clinicians continue to individualize patient treatment based on a myriad of factors that relate to the patient, the patient's tumor, and the known biology of the disease.






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