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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 144-162

Indian studies on genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk


1 Institute of Allied Health (Paramedical) Services, Education and Training, Department of Biochemistry, Government Medical College, Haldwani, Uttarakhand, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Government Medical College, Haldwani, Uttarakhand, India
3 Plantation Management and Studies, Sikkim University, Gangtok, Sikkim, India

Correspondence Address:
A Bag
Institute of Allied Health (Paramedical) Services, Education and Training, Department of Biochemistry, Government Medical College, Haldwani, Uttarakhand
India
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Source of Support: State Biotechnology Department, Uttarakhand, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.98941

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Genetic influences on cancer development have been extensively investigated during the last decade following publication of human genome sequence. The present review summarizes case-control studies on genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk in Indians. It is observed that the most commonly studied genes in the Indian population included members of phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes. Other than these genes, genetic polymorphisms for cell cycle and apoptosis-related factors, DNA repair enzymes, immune response elements, growth factors, folate metabolizing enzymes, vitamin/hormone receptors, etc., were investigated. Several studies also evidenced a stronger risk for combined genotypes rather than a single polymorphism. Gene-environment interaction was also found to be a determining factor for cancer development in some experiments. Data for single polymorphism and single cancer type, however, was insufficient to validate an association. It appears that much more experiments involving larger sample size, cross-tabulating genetic polymorphisms and environmental factors are required in order to identify genetic markers for different cancers in Indian populations.






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