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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 448-451

Epidemiology and resistance pattern of bacterial isolates among cancer patients in a Tertiary Care Oncology Centre in North India


1 Department of Medical Oncology, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Lab Medicine, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
U Batra
Department of Medical Oncology, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.200647

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OBJECTIVES: To examine the epidemiology of microbiologically documented bacterial infection and the resistance pattern, among cancer patients undergoing treatment at RGCIRC, Delhi. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective observational study in which culture reports obtained over 1 year in 2013, were analyzed. RESULTS: 13329 cultures were obtained over 1 year in 2013 and were analyzed. 23.6 % samples showed positive culture with majority being gram negative isolates (67.9 %). E. coli was the commonest gram negative isolate (49.4%) followed by klebsella (29.7%) and Staph. aureus was the commonest gram positive isolate. There was high incidence of ESBL in blood and urine (87.2% & 88.5%) and BLBLI were also high (78% & 83.9%). Carbapenem resistance was comparatively low (10%) and colistin sensitivity was quiet high (> 95%). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of MRSA and VRE in our institute is very less, whereas prevalence of ESBLs and BLBLI isolates amongst gram negative infections is around 80%. Gram negative isolates had poor sensitivity to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones.






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