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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 452-453

The microbial etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of bloodstream infections in patients with cancer at a private tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India


Department of Infection Prevention and Control, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
T Singhal
Department of Infection Prevention and Control, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital and Medical Research Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.200650

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BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of blood stream infections in patients with cancer is crucial to design empirical therapy regimes. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study at a tertiary care private hospital in Mumbai, India from Nov 2009 - Dec 2014. RESULTS: A total of 62 episodes of blood stream infections in 57 patients with cancer were recorded during the study period. Analysis was limited to 52 isolates from 49 episodes in 45 patients. Gram negative pathogens caused 77% of these infections; commonest pathogens were E. coli and Klebsiella. High prevalence of antimicrobial resistance was noted. Susceptibility in E. coli, Klebsiella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas to 3rd generation cephalosporins, beta lactam beta lactamase inhibitor combinations, carbapenems and amikacin was 4%, 56.5%, 70% and 86% respectively. CONCLUSION: The high rates of antimicrobial resistance in gram negative isolates is alarming.






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