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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 73-81

Is pneumonectomy a justified procedure in patients with persistent N2 nonsmall cell lung cancer disease following induction therapy


Department of Thoracic Surgery, University College London Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. S Mitsos
Department of Thoracic Surgery, University College London Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, London
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijc.IJC_209_17

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Optimal management and the role of surgery in multimodality treatment for N2 disease nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are controversial. In this review, we focus on the possible role of pneumonectomy as a justified procedure in patients with persistent N2 disease following induction therapy. We have conducted an OVID PubMedbased search including manuscripts published in English for relevant studies. The interpretation of these trials highlights the lack of clarity and consistency in our management and leaves areas of controversy. There are no Level 1 data to support either performing or not performing pneumonectomy in this setting. The majority of the literature reviewed stresses the high risk of mortality and morbidity following pneumonectomy as a part of a trimodality approach to Stage IIIA/N2 NSCLC disease. However, selected highvolume institutions do follow this strategy with the level of risk seemingly justifying it for a highly selected group of patients, and this approach to Stage III/N2 NSCLC can be offered safely with acceptable mortality. Patient selection, response rate to induction therapy, and R0 resection are crucial for survival in experienced centers.






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