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MINI SYMPOSIUM: HEAD AND NECK
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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15--20

Feasibility of organ-preservation strategies in head and neck cancer in developing countries

NP Trivedi, VD Kekatpure, NN Trivedi, MA Kuriakose, G Shetkar, BV Manjula 
 Department of Head and Neck Oncology, Mazumdar-Shaw Cancer Center, Narayana Hrudayalaya, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
N P Trivedi
Department of Head and Neck Oncology, Mazumdar-Shaw Cancer Center, Narayana Hrudayalaya, Bangalore
India

Background: Chemoradiotherapy is an established strategy for organ preservation in head-neck cancer. These protocols are associated with added toxicity and need support infrastructure. Practice setup and availability of resources vary at the community level in developing countries. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of organ-preservation strategies in different settings in developing countries. Settings and Design : Survey. Materials and Methods: In a questionnaire-based study, questions were directed to clinicians with varied practice setups to gather information regarding infrastructure, finance, and feasibility of organ-preservation protocols and their current practice trends. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive. Results: Responses from 100 clinicians with focused practice in head-neck oncology were analyzed. Sixty-one percent clinicians were practicing organ preservation for advanced head-neck cancers in their practice. However, 65% centers lacked sufficient infrastructure to support organ-preservation protocols. Forty percent patients were treated on cobalt-radiotherapy machine. Fifty-nine percent of clinicians suggested that less than third of their patients were fit to undergo chemoradiation and 67% believed that adherence to treatment protocol was observed in less than two-thirds of cases. Based on their experience 82% clinicians felt that only one-third patients requiring salvage would actually undergo treatment. The majority of the patients (68%) used personal funds for treatment and less than one-third of the patients could afford complete treatment. Conclusions: The infrastructure needed to support organ-preservation protocols varies significantly between centers in developing countries. It may not be feasible to perform organ-preservation strategies in certain centers and feasibility guidelines should be made for their judicious use in developing countries.


How to cite this article:
Trivedi N P, Kekatpure V D, Trivedi N N, Kuriakose M A, Shetkar G, Manjula B V. Feasibility of organ-preservation strategies in head and neck cancer in developing countries.Indian J Cancer 2012;49:15-20


How to cite this URL:
Trivedi N P, Kekatpure V D, Trivedi N N, Kuriakose M A, Shetkar G, Manjula B V. Feasibility of organ-preservation strategies in head and neck cancer in developing countries. Indian J Cancer [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Jul 12 ];49:15-20
Available from: http://www.indianjcancer.com/article.asp?issn=0019-509X;year=2012;volume=49;issue=1;spage=15;epage=20;aulast=Trivedi;type=0