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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 393-400

Profile of dual tobacco users in India: An analysis from Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2009-10


1 Healis Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA
3 World Health Organization, Regional Office for South East Asia, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
C S Ray
Healis Sekhsaria Institute for Public Health, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: South-East Asia Regional Office of the World Health Organization., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-509X.107746

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Introduction: Individuals who use both smoked and smokeless tobacco products (dual tobacco users) form a special group about which little is known. This group is especially relevant to India, where smokeless tobacco use is very common. The aim of this study was to characterise the profile of dual users, study their pattern of initiation to the second product, their attitudes toward quittingas well as their cessation profile. Methods and Materials: The GATS dataset for India was analyzed using SPSS; . Results: In India, dual tobacco users (42.3 million; 5.3% of all adults; 15.4% of all tobacco users) have a profile similar to that of smokers. Some 52.6% of dual users started both practices within 2 years. The most prevalent product combination was bidi-khaini (1.79%) followed by bidi-gutka (1.50%), cigarette-khaini (1.28%), and cigarette-gutka (1.22%). Among daily users, the correlation between the daily frequencies of the use of each product was very high for most product combinations. While 36.7% of dual users were interested in quitting, only 5.0% of dual users could do so. The prevalence of ex-dual users was 0.4%. Conclusion: Dual users constitute a large, high-risk group that requires special attention.






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